Saturday, February 1, 2014

Schapelle Corby - A formal complaint to the UK's Press Complaints Commission, re Daily Mail smears against an innocent woman


















Also widely shared on Facebook HERE

To the Press Complaints Commission

Good morning,

I wish to lodge a formal complaint about this Daily Mail article of 30 January 2014, relating to "Accuracy," as per these quoted guidelines from your site . . .

i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including pictures.

ii) A significant inaccuracy, misleading statement or distortion once recognised must be corrected, promptly and with due prominence, and - where appropriate - an apology published. In cases involving the Commission, prominence should be agreed with the PCC in advance.

There are multiple issues with the Daily Mail piece, and I'm sure you'll hear from many others, but for brevity and simplicity these are the glaring problems I (personally), wish to raise with you - and dissecting this quote from the newspaper goes to the heart of them:

"The Schapelle movie is based partly on a book Sins of the Father by Sydney journalist Eamonn Duff, which squarely points the finger at Schapelle's father as having bought the marijuana and sending his daughter to the holiday island to traffick the drugs to tourists.

The book was able to be published because Mick Corby, who had a record for cannabis possession and alleged drug trade connections, died from cancer in 2008."

So here are my points (as extracted from the above quote):

One

". . . which squarely points the finger at Schapelle's father as having bought the marijuana and sending his daughter to the holiday island to traffick the drugs to tourist."

Any reasonable person reading that would assume it's "Normal" for Australians to take commercial amounts of marijuana FROM Australia, TO Bali ". . . to traffick the drugs to tourists," but nothing could be further from the truth.  Schapelle is the first person in living history (before or since), accused of this "Crime," as per these early press reports - and Australian Customs have also confirmed this "Flow" does not exist, as per their letter to a concerned member of the public. This is because around the time Schapelle flew from Australia to Bali, marijuana was over 100 times cheaper in Indonesia (as compared to Australia).  This is clearly validated in this snippet from this United Nations report.

Therefore, many people reasonably think Schapelle was an unwitting drug mule for criminal baggage handlers, as described in this article, which quotes senior police officer Ray Cooper. Schapelle took a domestic flight from Brisbane to Sydney, and then travelled on to Bali. It's logical to assume the drugs were intended for Sydney (were they had a profitable street value), rather than Bali (where they did not) - however the corrupt baggage handlers made a "Mistake," the contraband accidentally flew on to Bali, and the rest is history.

The author of the article completely fails to mention this crucial information (re the uniqueness of the charges against Schapelle, the price differential and the correspondence from Australian Customs), and also fails to mention the very widely held alternative scenario, thus grossly misleading readers.  That is my first complaint.

Two

"The book was able to be published because Mick Corby, who had a record for cannabis possession and alleged drug trade connections, died from cancer in 2008."

The author fails to mention why the book was " . . . able to be published" only after Michael Corby died (which is a crucial omission likely to have a serious impact on reader perceptions), it's because in Australia the families of the dead cannot sue for defamation.  If Michael Corby was alive, he would have sued the author and won - just as Schapelle's sister Mercedes Corby sued Channel 7 for similar untruthful allegations, and won.

Then this quote: " . . . who had a record for cannabis possession" leads reasonable people to believe Michael Corby had a police record for cannabis possession, he did not - and here is the evidence, a certificate relating to his clean background from the Queensland Police, which you are welcome to independently verify.

Further, despite spruiking these lies about Michael Corby " . . . and alleged drug trade connections" the author completely fails to mention those "Alleged drug trade connections" were thoroughly rubbished by the Queensland Police.  Here's what they said . . . Queensland Police today said investigations into the statements made against Mr Corby had found them to be unjustified. "Queensland Police has no evidence to link Michael Corby with involvement in the drug trade," a police spokesperson told AAP. "It's dead, over. It's an old story and I don't know why it's getting more attention." . . . from this article.

The collection of serious issues raised in point two above (taken as a whole), give the reader a seriously skewed and inaccurate picture. That is my second complaint.

I look forward to your response.

Regards, Mrs. Kim Bax